Our Beacon Forum Index Back to Homepage
Our Beacon
Salamun alaikum!
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Arabic Root List and Dictionary--Lane's Lexicon Ar-En

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Our Beacon Forum Index -> QRLT
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Our Beacon Group



Joined: 18 Dec 2006
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2006 10:35 pm    Post subject: Arabic Root List and Dictionary--Lane's Lexicon Ar-En Reply with quote

Arabic Root Search and Dictionary, containing a Root List with all roots and verses and a Link to the online Lane's Lexicon AR-EN Dictionary. These can also be downloaded for Free.

Root List Ar-En

If you speak a European language, the root system of Arabic may be an unfamiliar concept. Arabic words are made from a few component letters, commonly called a "root". A root usually consists of three letters (sometimes 2 or 4), which convey a basic idea. By adding various vowels (i.e. changing pronunciation) as affixes*, associated meanings can be derived. For example, the Arabic letters: Siin–Lam–Miim (see above: س ل م and remember Arabic words go from right to left, unlike English) are the root for the following words: salaam (peace), islam (submission/compliance/conformance/surrender), muslim (one who submits/complies/conforms/surrenders). In all these words, you will see the root (component letters) are the same, and in the same order, i.e. Siin-Lam-Miim.

In a root language, words mean what they mean because they are built from other words; these base words are called roots. Now, while most languages are concept languages, there are some words that can be likened to the root system, e.g: if you learn what the word "act" means, you should have no problem when you hear the word "actor" or "action" - you use the root to understand the word built from the root.


Classical Arabic as one of the most primitive Semitic languages is primarily a root language. Almost every word gets its meaning from the roots it is built from rather than by associating a concept with the word. This gives Arabic an almost crystal clear aspect to it; there is little ambiguity or confusion in a classical Arabic sentence. The language is one of clarity, directness, and certainty - qualities that are hard to achieve in other languages.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Our Beacon Forum Index -> QRLT All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group